Browsing All posts tagged under »National Institute of Justice«

Joan Petersilia’s 5 Reason’s Prison Reduction Can Work

July 19, 2012 by

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At the recent NIJ conference, Joan Petersilia served as the keynote speaker. Petersilia’s work is well known throughout the field, and her long experience as a criminologist makes her uniquely suited to comment on the issue of reducing incarceration. Petersilia, who was given free reign in her discussion topic, contextualized the current move to reduce […]

Darnell Hawkins’ and a Research Agenda for Ethnicity Studies and Crime

June 22, 2012 by

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Darnell Hawkins spoke at the National Institute of Justice Annual Conference held this week. On a panel titled “The Relationships Between Neighborhoods, Race and Crime,” Hawkins discussed his perspective on the study of race and crime as a an academic with a long and respected career. While he described himself self-deprecatingly as “grumpy” about our […]

Reducing Human Error in Fingerprint Analysis

June 8, 2012 by

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The human fingerprint has been used by law enforcement for over a hundred years. Until the development of DNA as a forensic tool, the fingerprint was the single most important type of crime-scene evidence. As a unique identifier, the fingerprint captured not only our forensic attention, but our collective armchair detective imaginations. Puddn’head Wilson, after […]

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