Browsing All posts tagged under »National Institute of Justice«

Joan Petersilia’s 5 Reason’s Prison Reduction Can Work

July 19, 2012 by


At the recent NIJ conference, Joan Petersilia served as the keynote speaker. Petersilia’s work is well known throughout the field, and her long experience as a criminologist makes her uniquely suited to comment on the issue of reducing incarceration. Petersilia, who was given free reign in her discussion topic, contextualized the current move to reduce […]

Darnell Hawkins’ and a Research Agenda for Ethnicity Studies and Crime

June 22, 2012 by


Darnell Hawkins spoke at the National Institute of Justice Annual Conference held this week. On a panel titled “The Relationships Between Neighborhoods, Race and Crime,” Hawkins discussed his perspective on the study of race and crime as a an academic with a long and respected career. While he described himself self-deprecatingly as “grumpy” about our […]

Reducing Human Error in Fingerprint Analysis

June 8, 2012 by


The human fingerprint has been used by law enforcement for over a hundred years. Until the development of DNA as a forensic tool, the fingerprint was the single most important type of crime-scene evidence. As a unique identifier, the fingerprint captured not only our forensic attention, but our collective armchair detective imaginations. Puddn’head Wilson, after […]


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